Schools

Identifying and treating behavioral health needs that underlie school infractions is critical to preventing school exclusion and entry into the juvenile justice system, addressing root causes of behavior, and bolstering overall school climate.

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Adolescent Mental Health Training for School Resource Officers

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Strategic Planning

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School Diversion, Behavioral Health, and Juvenile Justice | EXPANDCOLLAPSE

Increasing the number of youth with behavioral health disorders diverted out of the juvenile justice system to effective community-based programs and services… Read More

Students with behavioral health needs are disproportionately subject to exclusionary school discipline and school-based arrests. These experiences often place them on a pathway from school misbehavior to juvenile justice system involvement, resulting in a range of poor outcomes.

The Improving Diversion Policies and Programs for Justice-Involved Youth with Behavioral Health Disorders: An Integrated Policy Academy-Action Network Initiative, with the support of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, is a collaboration between the National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice and the Technical Assistance Collaborative. This project supports cross systems teams of state and local leaders in developing and implementing a School Responder Model to address behavioral health needs of students through community-based services that keep youth in school and out of the justice system.  Technical assistance is provided to teams around the structure of successful School Responder Model initiatives, building the necessary collaborative team, identification of youth in need through screening and assessment, processes to develop enduring systems of referral to effective services, and data collection and analysis.  Teams implement initiatives in order to redirect youth with behavioral health needs from school-justice pathways to community-based supports that foster school success.

Policy Academy-Action Network States, by Project Year

2012-2013 – To learn more about specific projects, click on the respective state.

2014-2015

2015-2016

All States

Arkansas Kentucky Michigan Michigan Minnesota Mississippi New York State South Carolina Virginia

School-Justice Partnership Program | EXPANDCOLLAPSE

Working to improve outcomes for youth and communities through coordination and collaboration among schools, behavioral health providers, law enforcement, and juvenile justice officials.… Read More

Students with behavioral health needs are disproportionately subject to exclusionary school discipline and school-based arrests.  These experiences often place them on a pathway from school misbehavior to juvenile justice system involvement, resulting in a range of poor outcomes.

The purpose of this project is to enhance collaboration and coordination among schools, mental and behavioral health specialists, law enforcement and juvenile justice officials to help students succeed in school and prevent negative outcomes for youth and communities. The NCMHJJ serves as a core partner in this work, which is spearheaded by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges through a grant from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.  Project efforts directly support targeted sites in implementation of supportive school discipline approaches and provide information for the field through development of tools, training materials, and other resources.

Arkansas Kentucky Michigan Michigan Minnesota Mississippi New York State South Carolina Virginia

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Homepage of "Building a School Responder Model: Guidance From Existing Diversion Initiatives on For Youth With Behavioral Health Needs" with the word "How?" and steps listed beneath it, next to a picture of a rocket blasting off; on the right, navigation through the steps is visible
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Building a School Responder Model: Guidance From Existing Diversion Initiatives for Youth With Behavioral Health Needs

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Diverting Youth With Behavioral Health Needs From the School-Justice Pathway: School-Based Behavioral Health Diversion—Who, Why, and How

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School Responder Model: Addressing Behavioral Health Needs to Keep Kids in School

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Emerging Opportunities to Use Medicaid to Support Trauma Services in Schools

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A Silent Epidemic

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Civil Rights Data Collection Site

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Adolescent Mental Health Training for SROs Flyer

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School Justice Reform Flyer

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Tools for School-Based Diversion Success

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School-Based Behavioral Health Diversion – Which Youth and What Services?

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Building the Right Cross-Systems Team to Support your Diversion: The Responder Model

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Breaking the School to Prison Pipeline – The school-based diversion initiative for youth with mental disorders

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Implementing School-Based Diversion for Youth with Behavioral Health Needs: The Responder Model

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School Pathways to the Juvenile Justice System Project: A Practice Guide

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MFC Innovation Brief: Schools Turn to Treatment, Not Punishment, for Children with Mental Health Needs

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Out of School & Off Track: The Overuse of Suspensions in American Middle and High Schools

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The SBDI Toolkit: A Community Resource for Reducing School-Based Arrests

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School-Based Diversion: Strategic Innovations from the Mental Health/Juvenile Justice Action Network

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Are Zero Tolerance Policies Effective in the Schools? An Evidentiary Review and Recommendations

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School-Justice Partnership National Resource Center

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CHDI School-Based Diversion Initiative Website

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